Colonization and Development of Oribatid Mite Communities (Acari: Oribatida) on Post-Industry Dump (Prace Naukowe Uniwersytetu Slaskiego W Katowicach,)
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Colonization and Development of Oribatid Mite Communities (Acari: Oribatida) on Post-Industry Dump (Prace Naukowe Uniwersytetu Slaskiego W Katowicach,) by Piotr Skubaa

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Published by Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Slaskiego .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Life Sciences - Zoology - General,
  • Science

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages206
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13183605M
ISBN 10832261327X
ISBN 109788322613276

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The oribatid mite fauna on the mine dump and in the adjacent mixed forest has been the subject of the study. Three study plots, differing in age and plant cover, have been chosen on the dump. A continuos increase in abundance of oribatids, species richness with Cited by: 4.   Abiotic variables that affect diversity in canopy oribatid mite communities may be similar to those affecting ground soil/litter oribatid mites where variability in diversity and distribution mainly depends on soil humidity, pH, and the physical and chemical composition of litter produced by tree species (Klironomos and Kendrick ).Cited by: A comparative study on oribatid mite communities was carried out at four sites forming a chronosequence of spruce forest stands (stand age: 5, 25, 45 and years; Tharandter Wald, Germany). A. Oribatid mites generally have low metabolic rates, slow development and low fecundity. Species are iteroparous with adults living a relatively long time; for example, estimates of development time from egg to adult vary from several months to two years in temperate forest soils. Oribatid mites have six active instars: prelarva, larva, three nymphal instars and the : Arachnida.

The studies were conducted on the old zinc metallurgic dump in Katowice (Upper Silesia, Poland). The structure of oribatid mite communities and ecological data of mites at three sites varying in. ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xvii, pages: illustrations, maps, portraits ; 27 cm: Contents: Machine derived contents note: PHYLOGENY, GENETICS AND SPECIATION --RICHARD H. THOMAS --Mites as models in development and genetics --BRIAN FENTON --Speciation and biogeography in eriophyid mites: a review --NICOLA .   Free Online Library: Oribatid mite communities (Acari: oribatida) in different habitats of the Polistovsky Nature Reserve (Pskov Region, Russia).(Report) by "Estonian Journal of Ecology"; Earth sciences Birds Analysis Insect populations Distribution Mites Natural areas Nature reserves Peat. The oribatid mite communities of the four forest types within the investigated regions were more similar to each other than among regions. This points to the importance of regional factors, such as temperature, precipitation and parent rock, being more important as structuring forces for oribatid mite communities than forest by:

Skubała P. Colonization and development of oribatid mite communities (Acari: Oribatida) on post-industrial dumps. Wyd. Uniwersytetu Śląskiego, Katowice Skubała P., Mierny A. Invasive Reynoutria taxa as a contaminant of soil. Does it reduce abundance and diversity of microarthropods and damage soil habitat?Cited by: 7. However, it is little studied if oribatid mite communities from dead wood on the forest floor resemble those of the soil or those of the bark of trees or if dead wood is colonized by a specific oribatid mite community (but see Skubała and Maślak, , Huhta et al., ).Cited by: The density of microarthropods and oribatid mite communities at three horizons (L, F/H, Ah) and on the bark of adjacent trees along an elevation gradient (, , and m) in the RBSF forest were studied. Oribatid mites were the most abundant group followed by Collembola and Gamasina. Exotic earthworms are drivers of biotic communities in invaded North American forest stands. Here we used ecologically important oribatid mite (Arachnida: Acari) communities, as model organisms to study the responses of litter- and soil-dwelling microarthropod communities to exotic earthworm invasion in a northern temperate forest. Litter- and soil-dwelling mites were sampled in – Cited by: